The Dutch Golden Age in Art; PIETER CLAESZ

The Dutch Golden Age in Holland (the Netherlands and Belgium).

Pieter Claesz, aka Pieter Claesz van Haarlem, (born 1597, Burgsteinfurt, bishopric of Münster (now Steinfurt, Germany)—died January 1, 1661, Haarlem, Netherlands), was one of the most prolific Dutch painters in hyper-realistic 17th century still-life and vanitas paintings during the economic boom and creative genius of the Dutch Golden Age of Art. His work was fastidious and precise but possessed an almost spiritual light in the subtle chiaroscuro of shadow and candle flame or golden rays from an open window caressing silver platters and bowls of fruit, nuts, seafood, cheese, game, and wines of lavish table settings. The first art I really truly fell in love with was Flemish still life when I attended the exhibition in Boston in 1993: The Age of Rubens.

 Pieter Claesz, Still Life with a Nautilus Cup, 17th century,  Dutch Golden Age

Pieter Claesz, Still Life with a Nautilus Cup, 17th century, Dutch Golden Age

 Pieter Claesz (1597-1660) “Still Life. Food, Glasses and a Jug on a Table” (1640)  Dutch Golden Age

Pieter Claesz (1597-1660) “Still Life. Food, Glasses and a Jug on a Table” (1640) Dutch Golden Age

 Still-life by  Pieter Claesz

Still-life by Pieter Claesz

 Still Life with Salt Shaker  Pieter Claesz , 1640

Still Life with Salt Shaker Pieter Claesz, 1640

 Still life by  Pieter Claesz , 1629

Still life by Pieter Claesz, 1629

 Still life by  Pieter Claesz , 1629

Still life by Pieter Claesz, 1629

  PIETER CLAESZ  1598-1661

PIETER CLAESZ 1598-1661

Learn more about the Dutch Golden Age in Art before you tour your next museum… their treasures are scattered all over the earth, especially in Europe and in the United States.

The Dutch are famous for still-life paintings. These began with sober arrangements of objects chosen to remind viewers of the brevity of life, as can be seen in the early works of the pioneer Pieter Claesz. Later artists went on to paint sumptuous compositions of expensive objects that reflect the confidence and pride of the Golden Age.

Painters in the Dutch Republic in the 17th century pushed the possibilities of art far beyond previous limits. They observed the visible world closely and mastered techniques for representing it. They found new meanings in old stories—mythical, historical, and biblical—and staged and restaged scenes from the everyday human comedy. In fall 2015 and spring 2016, John Walsh and other scholars present a series of lectures that offer views on Dutch art of the Golden Age.

   READ THE FREE ART PAPER:    Stilled lives: self-portraiture and self-reflection in seventeenth-century Netherlandish still-life painting by Celeste Brusati

READ THE FREE ART PAPER: Stilled lives: self-portraiture and self-reflection in seventeenth-century Netherlandish still-life painting by Celeste Brusati

Rebecca PriceComment